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The Centre on Social Movement Studies

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LGBT activism and the making of Europe : a rainbow Europe?

Phillip M. Ayoub; David Paternotte

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Type: Edited Volume
Year: 2014

Europe has long been regarded as a unique place for the promotion and furthering of LGBT rights. This important and compelling study investigates the alleged uniqueness and its ties to a relatively long history of LGBT and queer movements in the region. Contributors argue that LGBT movements were inspired by specific ideas about European democratic values and a responsibility towards human rights, and that they sought to realize these on the ground through activism, often crossing borders to foster a wider movement. In making this argument, they discuss the ‘idea of Europe’ as it relates to LGBT rights, the history of European LGBT movements, the role of European institutions in adopting LGBT policies, and the construction of European ‘others’ in this process.

 

Table of Contents:

— 1. Introduction ; Phillip M. Ayoub and David Paternotte — PART I: Meanings of EUROPE — 2. The European Origins of Transnational Organizing: The International Committee for Sexual Equality; Leila J. Rupp — 3. LGBT activism in Kyrgyzstan: What Role for Europe?; Cai Wilkinson — 4. ‘In Europe it’s Different’: Homonationalism and Peripheral Desires for Europe; Gianmaria Colpani and Adriano José Habed — PART II: Practicing europe in lgbtq activism — 5. Deploying Europe: The Creation of Discursive Imperatives for Same-sex Unions; Kelly Kollman — 6. Transnational LGBTI Activism and the European Courts: Constructing the Idea of Europe; Anna van der Vleuten — 7. Queer Activism and the Idea of ‘Practicing Europe’; Konstantinos Eleftheriadis — PART III: Becoming EUROPEAN — 8. Trans Networking in the European Vortex: Between Advocacy and Grassroots Politics; Carsten Balzer and Jan Simon Hutta — 9. Transnational Solidarities and LGBTQ Politics in Poland; Jon Binnie and Christian Klesse — 10. Split Europe: Homonationalism and Homophobia in Croatia; Kevin Moss — 11. Conclusion
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. ISBN: 9781137391759

News

13/12/2017

Call for Paper: Conference “1968-2018, fifty years after: Where is the social movements field going?”

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Taking the 1968 anniversary as a stimulating moment for reflection, this conference seeks to provide space for looking at the implications of that period on social movement research as well as addressing a number of key questions in current social movement research.

04/12/2017

Martin Portos Garcia wins the ISA's Seventh Worldwide Competition for Junior Sociologists

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The International Sociological Association has just announced the list of the winners of the Seventh Worldwide Competition for Junior Sociologists engaged in social research, amongst which Martin Portos Garcia - post-doc fellow at COSMOS

10/11/2017

Call for Application Now Open: Summer School on Youth Political Participation in Times of Inequalities

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We are pleased to announce that the call for applications is now open for the Summer School on Youth Political Participation in Times of Inequalities, sponsored by the Reinventing Democracy in Europe: Youth Doing Politics in Times of Increasing Inequalities project (EURYKA) and the Centre on Social Movement Studies (COSMOS).

Publications

Journal Article - 2017

Repertoires of knowledge practices: Social movements in times of crisis

Donatella della Porta and Elena Pavan
Starting from the assumption that knowledge becomes all the more important for movements in times of crisis, as old structures are challenged and new ones envisaged and proved feasible, the purpose of this paper is to suggest ways to expand the toolkit of social movement studies in order to empirically address knowledge practices as a meaningful part of contemporary progressive activism.

Journal Article - 2017

’Solidarietà sconvenienti’. Reti online di estrema destra contro e per la riforma dell’Europa

Elena Pavan and Manuela Caiani
By focusing on the websites of extreme right organizations in six European countries (Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom) and by making a combined use of digital research tools and social network analysis, we explore how extreme right organizations make a strategic use of ICTs to connect in the online space and the arguments they move forward to criticize and reform current projects of European integration. Our results suggest that ICTs sustain the construction of inconvenient solidarities in heterogeneous ways, supporting different modes of online conversations amongst extreme right websites which, in turn, affect their capacity to propose shared critiques and proposals to reform the European Union.