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Cosmos

The Centre on Social Movement Studies

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Living with hard times: how European citizens deal with economic crises and their social and political consequences (LIVEWHAT)

TEAM

Lorenzo Bosi, Lorenzo Zamponi, and Herbert Reiter

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START YEAR 2013

END YEAR 2016

OVERVIEW

The proposed research deals with citizens’ reactions to economic crises and their social and political consequences. It examines in particular the ways in which European citizens have reacted to the crisis that, at different degree of intensity in different countries, struck Europe since 2008, but also how they deal with economic crises and their consequences more generally. We examine both individual and collective responses by citizens, both the “private” and the “public” dimensions of such responses, and both political and non-political responses. In addition, while the focus of the research is on citizens’ responses, we also examine policy responses so as to have a baseline for assessing citizens’ reactions to crises.

The project has three main objectives:

  • to provide systematic evidence of the ways in which European citizens react to economic crises and their social and political consequences, both individually and collectively;
  • to advance knowledge on the connections between individual factors, contextual factors, and the ways in which European citizens react to economic crises and their social and political consequences;
  • to suggest a number of good practices as to how to deal with economic crises, both at the social and political level, through which their negative consequences on European citizens can be avoided or limited.

The project’s objectives are addressed by means of six main types of data and methods:

  • the creation of a cross-national comparative dataset on economic, social, and political indicators;
  • an analysis of policy responses to crises;
  • an analysis of collective responses to crises in the public domain;
  • an analysis of individual responses to crises by private citizens;
  • experiments designed to assess causal effects of different dimensions of crises on citizens’ attitudes and behaviors;
  • an analysis of alternative forms of resilience in times of crisis.
                                  

FUNDING

European Commission, Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) on Citizens Resilience in Times of Crisis

 

News

08/06/2017

Call for Papers - Cosmos Conference "The Contentious Politics of Higher Education. Student Movements in Late Neoliberalism"

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The Centre on Social Movement Studies, directed by Professor Donatella Della Porta, calls for papers addressing the recent global wave of student protests for a two-days conference to bel held in Florence, at the Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences of the Scuola Normale Superiore (SNS), on 15-16 November 2017.

19/05/2017

Video available for the International Conference – Beyond Borders: Refugees and Struggles in Europe Mobilization, Solidarity and Political Challenges in the Long Summer of Migration

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Watch the video of the International Conference – Beyond Borders, which was held at Palazzo Strozzi on May 12, 2017

19/05/2017

Marco Deseriis wins Best Paper Award at the Cedem17 Conference for e-Democracy & Open Government

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Dr. Marco Deseriis, Marie Curie Fellow and Research Fellow at Cosmos, has won the Best Paper Award at the Cedem17 Conference for e-Democracy & Open Government (Danube University, Krems Au Donau, Austria)

Publications

Journal Article - 2017

Comparing Digital Protest Media Imaginaries: Anti-Austerity Movements in Greece, Italy & Spain

Emiliano Treré, Sandra Jeppensen and Alice Mattoni
Drawing on 60 semi­-structured interviews with activists involved in anti-austerity protests, the article brings together social movement studies and communications theories to compare digital protest media imaginaries in Greece, Spain and Italy

Journal Article - 2017

Technopopulism: The Emergence of a Discursive Formation

Marco Deseriis
This article argues that technopopulism is an emerging discursive formation that arises from the convergence of two preexisting discourses: populism and technolibertarianism. Whereas these discourses are historically distinct the global financial crisis and the 2011 wave of struggles precipitated the political conditions for their intersection and hybridization.