The Centre on Social Movement Studies


Media Practices and Protest Politics: How precarious workers mobilise

Alice Mattoni

Picture description
Type: Monograph
Year: 2012

How do precarious workers employed in call-centres, universities, the fashion industry and many other labour markets organise, struggle and communicate to become recognised, influential political subjects? “Media Practices and Protest Politics: How Precarious Workers Organise” reveals the process by which individuals at the margins of the labour market and excluded from the welfare state communicate and struggle outside the realm of institutional politics to gain recognition in the political sphere. In this important and thought provoking work, Alice Mattoni suggests an all-encompassing approach to understanding grassroots political communication in contemporary societies. Using original examples from precarious workers mobilizations in Italy, she explores a range of activist media practices and compares different categories of media technologies, organizations and outlets from the printed press to web application and from mainstream to alternative media. Explaining how activists perceive and understand the media environment in which they are embedded, the book discusses how they must interact with a diverse range of media professionals and technologies and considers how mainstream, radical left-wing and alternative media represent protests. “Media Practices and Protest Politics” offers important insights for understanding mechanisms and patterns of visibility in struggles for recognition and redistribution in post-democratic societies and provides a valuable contribution to the field of political communication and social movement studies.


Table of Contents:

–Preface; –Introduction; –Theoretical reflections on the study of grassroots political communication; –The discursive context and contentious field of precarity in Italy; –The construction of precarious subjects in mobilisations against precarity; –Reflections in the mirror: media knowledge practices; –Surfing media diversity: relational media practices; –The construction of public identities: media representations of protest; –Conclusions: the circuit of grassroots political communication; –Methodological appendix; References; –Index.
Farnham, Ashgate, 2012. ISBN: 9781409426783



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